2019 Spring Landscape Conference - Extreme Gardening: Native Plant Designs for Resiliency
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2019 Spring Landscape Conference - Extreme Gardening: Native Plant Designs for Resiliency

Gardeners and landscape professionals are continually faced with radical conditions—both climate- and site-related—in their quest to create beautiful, sustainable environments. Severe storms, wet and dry areas, steep slopes and rocky terrain, urbanization. Such challenges can exasperate even the most skilled expert. Discover native plant design solutions for difficult situations. Learn techniques and best practices for adapting to extreme circumstances while restoring balance to natural systems.

 Export to Your Calendar 3/11/2019
When: Monday, March 11, 2019 (snow date Friday, March 15)
8:30 am - 3:00 pm
Where: Westchester Community College
Classroom Building, Room C200
75 Grasslands Road
Valhalla, New York  10595
United States
Contact: Susan Palmer
914-606-7870


Online registration is available until: 3/7/2019
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The Native Plant Center’s

2019 Spring Landscape Conference

 

Extreme Gardening: Native Plant Designs for Resiliency

Monday, March 11, 2019, 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
(Snow date Friday, March 15)

Classroom Building, Room C200

 

Earn professional credits: 4 LA-CES credits and 4 ISA credits - Pending

 

Summary

 

Gardeners and landscape professionals are continually faced with radical conditions—both climate- and site-related—in their quest to create beautiful, sustainable environments. Severe storms, wet areas and dry areas, steep slopes and rocky terrain, urbanization. Such challenges can exasperate even the most skilled expert. Discover native plant design solutions for difficult situations. Learn techniques and best practices for adapting to extreme circumstances while restoring balance to natural systems.

 

8:30–9 a.m.
Registration/Continental breakfast

9–9:15 a.m.
Welcome

9:15–10:15 a.m.
Creating Resilient Urban Landscapes
Designing and maintaining resilient urban landscapes require testing and adaptive management as well as public engagement and education. Through cooperative work among ecologists and designers, specific research sites can be identified and studied to generate robust scientific data that help inform and adaptively manage resilient landscapes. Find out how these collaboratively devised experiments meld scientific investigation with purposeful landscape design.

Alexander J. Felson, PhD, is an associate professor at Yale University, a senior certified ecologist, and a registered landscape architect. He founded the Urban Ecology and Design Lab and runs Ecopolitan Design. The firm and lab integrate applied ecology with landscape architecture and urban design focusing on climate adaptation, green infrastructure, and resilient ecosystems.

10:15–11:15 a.m.
Storm Readiness: Managing Trees
Frequent severe weather events have become a common occurrence. Trees are especially at risk during intense storms. Learn how The New York Botanical Garden monitors and cares for its mature and valued specimens, which species better confront extreme weather in our area, and how to guard beloved woody plants from nature’s ferocity.

Deanna F. Curtis is Curator of Woody Plants and Landscape Project Manager at The New York Botanical Garden, where she develops, documents, and helps manage the historic hardy tree and shrub collections. She also manages the horticultural aspects of the Garden’s landscape design and construction projects. She holds a degree in horticulture from Michigan State University and graduate degrees in both horticulture and landscape architecture from Cornell University.

11:15–11:30 a.m.
Break

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Designing for Streambanks and Slopes
What can be done when manmade flood control measures fail or a steep grade of varying conditions is colonized by invasive plants? Explore how the Cornell Botanic Gardens dealt with both issues and turned daunting situations into successful restoration and usable native habitat.

Krissy Boys is the Natural Areas Wildflower Gardener at Cornell Botanic Gardens, where she manages the Mundy Wildflower Garden. She began her 25-year gardening career with native plants under Millersville Plant Conference founder F.M. Mooberry at the Brandywine Conservancy and Brandywine River Museum. She has been a member of the Steering Committee of the Finger Lakes Native Plant Society since 1998.

 

12:30–2:00 p.m.
Lunch and networking

2–3 p.m.
Narratives of Ecology and Culture
A design framework based on exploration of a site’s ecological and cultural history provides focused strategies for resilience, and reveals native plant communities with the capacity to restore degraded land and site narratives with the capacity to inspire stewardship. Gain insight into strategies for coaxing a design idea from the history of a site and adapting principles of restoration ecology to large and small landscapes for enduring environments.

Jeffrey Longhenry, Senior Associate at Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, leads projects that emphasize contemporary expression of ecological systems within the landscape. Current work includes Hudson Yards Public Square and Gardens, Naval Cemetery Landscape, and master planning efforts at Mt. Cuba Center and the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens. He earned his Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Please note: Snow date program subject to change.