2020 Spring Landscape Conference - Places for Pollinators: Designing Welcoming Landscapes
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2020 Spring Landscape Conference - Places for Pollinators: Designing Welcoming Landscapes

Across the country bees, butterflies, and birds have become celebrities as a growing demand to create appropriate habitat gains steam through professional and grassroots actions. Find out about the needs of pollinators and the challenges they face. Explore designs and native plants to use in creating beneficial sites. Discover the movement that is changing backyards and community landscapes while supporting the survival of these critical creatures.

3/9/2020
When: Monday, March 9, 2020 (snow date Friday, March 13)
8:30 am - 3:00 pm
Where: Westchester Community College
Classroom Building, Room C200
75 Grasslands Road
Valhalla, New York  10595
United States
Contact: Mary Ietaka
914-606-7870


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The Native Plant Center’s

2020 Spring Landscape Conference

 

Places for Pollinators: Designing Welcoming Landscapes

Monday, March 9, 2020, 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
(Snow date Friday, March 13)

 

Classroom Building, Room C200

 

Earn professional credits: 4 LA-CES, 4 CNLP-NY, 4 CNLP-NJ, 3 ISA

 

 

Places for Pollinators: Designing Welcoming Landscapes

 

News headlines shout the startling facts of the decline in pollinator populations and the resulting threats to plant life. Across the country bees, butterflies, and birds have become celebrities as a growing demand to create appropriate habitat gains steam through professional and grassroots actions. Find out about the needs of pollinators and the challenges they face. Explore designs and native plants to use in creating beneficial sites. Discover the movement that is changing backyards and community landscapes while supporting the survival of these critical creatures.

 

8:30–9 a.m.

Registration/Continental breakfast

 

9–9:15 a.m.

Welcome

 

9:15–10:15 a.m.

What Bees Need: Survival Essentials and Threats

Maria van Dyke

The health of native bees is dependent on the proximity of pollen and nesting resources, their ability to deal with weather conditions, and pressures from pests, pathogens, pesticides, and land development. Learn the fundamentals of bee biology and survival, the threats they face, and how to support both specialist and generalist bees in your landscapes.

 

Maria van Dyke is a plant and native bee ecologist at the Native Bee Research Lab, Cornell University. She has co-authored several guides on pesticides and pollinators as well as the soon-to-be released Native Plant Gardening for Specialist Bees in collaboration with Cornell Botanic Gardens. She also helped to research and edit The Solitary Bees: Biology, Evolution, Conservation.

 

10:15–11:15 a.m.

Strategies and Designs to Improve Landscape Performance

Andrew Sell

Landscape architects, land managers, and home gardeners play a crucial role in the preservation of pollinators. Find out how to support these important species at multiple scales and in varying urban conditions through thoughtful site analysis, landscape design, and maintenance choices. Gain insight on projects that have made a difference by increasing habitat value.

 

Andrew Sell is Associate Landscape Ecologist and Designer at Sasaki, a Boston-based planning and design firm. He has trained and worked in the fields of horticulture, public garden administration, and landscape architecture. His professional focus is the translation of scientific research into physical design with a passion for increasing ecological complexity in urban and suburban settings.   

 

11:15–11:30 a.m.

Break

 

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

How Native Plant Cultivars Affect Plant/Pollinator Interactions

Annie S. White, Ph.D.

The growing demand for native plants coupled with the horticulture industry’s desire for plants with unique characteristics has led to the increased selection, breeding, and availability of native cultivars. But are these “nativars” as valuable for pollinators as the straight species? Discover the answer through the research and field data collection that measured pollinator preference for native species versus native cultivars.

 

Annie S. White, Ph.D., is an ecological landscape designer and the owner of Nectar Landscape Design Studio in Vermont. She is a lecturer of landscape design at the University of Vermont, where she earned her doctorate in Plant and Soil Science and carried out research on plant/pollinator interactions. She has an MS in Landscape Architecture from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

 

12:30–2 p.m.

Lunch and networking

 

2–3 p.m.

Pollinator Pathways: Connecting Habitats Town by Town

Mary Ellen Lemay

In just two years, the Pollinator Pathway grassroots movement has sprouted in more than 75 communities in New York and Connecticut, empowering people in their own yards and neighborhoods to help these at-risk creatures. By planting native species, avoiding pesticides, and reducing lawn, this scalable initiative is creating healthy, connected environments. Find out the simple steps you can take to be part of the solution.

 

Mary Ellen Lemay is Landowner Engagement Director for Aspetuck Land Trust in Connecticut and Pollinator Pathway Facilitator for the Hudson-to-Housatonic Regional Conservation Partnership. She is a member of the Connecticut Native Plants Working Group, chairs the Trumbull, CT, Conservation Commission, and is on the board of the Merritt Parkway Conservancy. She earned a Master’s in Environmental Management from Yale School of Forestry.

 

Please note: Snow date program subject to change.